Progressives

The word progressive is a dynamic term. According to Merriam-Webster, there are 10 major definitions split over two entries. I guess the first thing that comes to mind when I think of progressives is the movement that took place around the turn of last century, during the Roosevelt and Taft administrations, with magazines like McClure’s and the muckrakers. Whenever I hear someone say “progressives” I think of Doris Kearns Goodwin’s outstanding book The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism. That book was so good it made a flight from Washington/Dulles to Los Angeles pass by in the blink of an eye.

It is a versatile term. Back when I was flying, at unfamiliar airports, you could request a “progressive taxi.” Typically, as you roll off the runway, ground control gives you a series of “intersections” to get you to where you are going. They might say something like, “Take Charlie to Charlie 6 and cross 16-right to Bravo. Bravo to Bravo 4.” That can be a lot to remember, especially at an unfamiliar airport. In a progressive taxi, the controllers give you the first step: “Take Charlie to Charlie 6.” Once you reach the Charlie 6 intersection, they give you the next step. And so on.

It occurred to me that our car has something called “progressive” cruise control. I love this feature and use it often on our long drives. You set your speed, like any other cruise control, and then you set your distance in car-lengths. After that the car maintains the distance from the car in front of you, slowing when they slow, speed up when they speed up. When I use it, it is almost like we are tethered by a tractor beam

I was thinking about progressives because I got a new pair of glasses they other day. Like my old glasses, they have progressive lenses. Here “progressive” is a euphemism for “tri-focals” which itself code for “Jamie is getting old.” My vision changed a little in the last two years since my previous prescription. The new glasses definitely help.

One thing I’ve noticed: as my vision regresses, my use of my glasses progresses. I wear my glasses frequently these days. Because of that, as the kind people in my eye doctor’s office were adding the various features I had on my old glasses to the new ones (poly carb, anti-glare, blue-light blocking, etc.) I realized that I had an opportunity. For a while I’d been putting my sunglasses on over my glasses when outdoors. So I had them add “transitions” lenses to the mix. This is a progressive move on my part. It will help my look far less ridiculous when I am outdoors.

“Transitions” feels almost like a sibling of “progressives.” I like these lenses because the UV light darkens them and I don’t need my sunglasses in places where UV light is abundant. (Inside the car is not one of these places.) Of course, as soon as I got home I had to test them out. I went into the front yard, waited while my glasses adjusted, and then took a photo. I then went back into my office, waited for the UV light to die down and took another. There is a noticeable difference.

Progressives seem to be a theme with me these days. I’ve got progressive lenses, and a car with progressive cruise control. I’m not flying planes any more, but I am working on progressively improving my habits.

Thinking about progressives makes me think about progress. That in turn reminds me of a joke I once heard:

If pro is the opposite of con, what is the opposite of progress?

2 comments

  1. Hi Jamie, How long does it take for glasses to become clear after you come back inside? During the transition, can you see clearly inside the house?

    1. Viabhav, I’ve never thought to time it but it is pretty fast: probably less than 10 seconds. And I don’t notice one way or the other. I can see clearly both inside and outside. It’s only when I take off my glasses that things start to get fuzzy.

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