Tag: signs

Final day

There were signs posted all around the gym yesterday on 8-1/2 x 11 inch paper and each of them said, in large black letters, “Final Day”. I thought it was funny. It reminded me of existentialism and things like Sartre’s No Exit or Bret Easton Ellis’s Less Than Zero. But here it was hanging in the gym: Final Day. Can’t get more existential than that.

While I never found out what the sign was for, I suspect it was the “final day” of some special that the gym was offering.

Church signs, part 2

Okay, so I was so curious about this church sign phenomenon that I spent some time browsing and found a sign that stopped me in my tracks.

This makes no sense to me. In fact, I think the sign should read the opposite: Reason is the greatest ally that faith has. It seems simple to me. If human beings couldn’t reason, if they couldn’t have made logical connections between things, then humanity would have died off long ago. And since faith requires people, without humanity, no faith. Clearly, then, the only reason faith exists is due to the fact that reason has allowed it to exist. It took reasoning to learn how to handle fire; it took reasoning to learn how to conquer disease. These things have allowed people to survive and become what they are today. How in the world can reason be the greatest enemy faith has?

Of course, I’m just being reasonable, so what do I know.

Church signs

What’s up with church signs? It seems that the signs outside of most churches try to present some kind of important moral message to people, which is a good and noble thing. But why do the people who come up with the signs think that they all need to be clever in order for the message to get through. Is this something that I have just now been noticing or has this been going on for some time now? I suspect it has based on a quick Google search I just did.

Case in point: there is a church not too far from my house with the following sign out front:

REMAIN IN THE SON TO KEEP FROM BURNING

I’ll admit, it’s clever. (Although I will also point out that Shakespeare was there first: remember from Hamlet: “Not so my lord, I am too much in the son.”) But why do moral messages have to be clever in the first place? Why can’t they just give simple, direct message?

If I ran a church, here are the signs that I would put up:

BE NICE TO OTHERS
DON’T RUN STOP SIGNS
READ TO YOUR KIDS
YOU SHOULD BE PAYING ATTENTION TO THE ROAD INSTEAD OF READING THIS SIGN

But what do I know about this kind of thing.